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Thursday, February 22, 2018

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 8:ASA BARROWS OF PARIS, ME.

My 4x great grandfather Asa Barrows was one of the first of my ancestors for whom  I found a Revolutionary War veteran pension file. He lived most of his life in what was then a remote region of New England, and as a result the entries for him in the town histories are probably based on family memories and hearsay. William  Berry Lapham and Silas P. Maxim have this for Asa in their History of Paris, Maine:

Three brothers by the name of Barrows, came from Middleborough, Mass. They were the sons of Moses and Deborah (Totman) Barrows of Plympton. Two of them, Asa and Malachi, settled in Paris, and Ansel in Sumner.

Asa Barrows was b. July 28, and m. Content Benson of Middleborough, Feb. 12, 1781. He settled on the lot, now the homestead of William A. King. He subscquenth' exchanged farms with Capt. Samuel King, and moved to High street, and afterward to "Hamlin's Grant." He was a prominent member of the Baptist church. Children:


Abijah, b. North Yarmouth, July 30, 1782. He was in the war of 1812,and died in the campaign in Northern New York.
Asa, b. in Paris, May 9, 1784, m. Anna Pike. He d. in Milan, N. H. *
Deborah, b. in Paris, May 21, 1786, d.---- . Hers was the first burial in the Bisco cemetery.
Polly, b. in Paris, Sept. '22, 1788, m. Morton Curtis, a 2d wife, and died 1879, at the age of 91 years.
Hannah, b. in Paris, Aug. 5, 1790, m. Moses Robbins, s. Milan, N. H.
Caleb Bensoni, b. in Paris, April 5, 1793, m. Abagail, dau. of Malachi Barrows, s. Hamlin's Grant; d. in Aroostook, aged about 90.
Rachael, b. in Paris, Aug. 3, 1795, m. John Ellingwood, s. Milan, N. H.
The mother died, 1735, the father died at Morton Curtis' 1850.-
pp501-502

History of Paris, Maine: From Its Settlement to 1880, with a History of the Grants of 1736 & 1771, Together with Personal Sketches, a Copious Genealogical Register and an Appendix  Printed for the Authors, 1894.

I'll be reposting what I have transcribed  of Asa's pension file next.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

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52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 7: MOSES BARROWS JR. OF PLYMPTON, MA.

My 5x great grandfather Moses Barrows Jr is a mystery and a source of aggravation to me.
First, I haven't found a record of his birth yet. I've searched the online birth records for Plympton, Ma. and the surrounding towns:Carver, Kingston, Rochester, and Hanson. It's possible he was born in Plymouth but those records aren't online. The various genealogy and family history books online do not have a birthdate either.

Secondly, there is a theory that there was Moses Jr is the gransdson of Moses Sr, not the son; this seems to have started with genealogist  Lucien Robinson who puts another Moses Barrows between the other two. But there is no record of the birth of that third Moses.

At any rate, my 5th grandfather Moses Barrows Jr. married Deborah Totman on 29 Dec 1748 at Plympton, Ma. I've found that record. However, no such luck with some of their childrens' births:
Asa Barrow b   28 Jul 1751 at Plymouth, Ma. (my 4x great grandfather)
Moses 
Carver
Ansel
Malachi
Mary
I've got a lot of work to do with this family group!
  

Sunday, February 11, 2018

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52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 6: MOSES BARROWS SR. OF PLYMPTON, MA.

There isn't a lot of information  available online about my  6x great grandfather Moses Barrows Sr. of Plympton, Ma.,  and some family trees at Ancestry.com contradict what I have for him.

Moses was born to George and Patience (Simmons) Barrows at Plymouth, Ma on 14 Feb 1697.  He married Mary Carver 4Dec 1719, who was related to John Carver, the first Governor of Plimouth Plantation. Moses farmed in Plympton and also was involved in the fledgling iron ore industry at Sampson's Pond. The estate list in his probate file of July 1769  includes the following:

"The 16th part of a furnace by Samson's pond.
The right to the ore in Samson's pond."

The contradiction comes in his family. I have only two sons for him: Seth, born in Plympton in 1719, and Moses Jr, born in  1725. Seth was the administrator for his father's estate. Moses Jr , who is my 5x great grandfather, is not mentioned in the will, but by the time of his father's death he had moved up to New Hampshire,

But of the 42 family trees on Ancestry.com that Moses Barrows Sr. appears on, 18 of them list up to 9 children in the family, including Seth and Moses. None of these others are mentioned in the probate file. I suspect a mix up with another Moses Barrows. I hope to clear up the discrepancy as I add more
of the Barrows family to my data base.

Monday, February 05, 2018

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Wednesday, January 31, 2018

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 5: GEORGE BARROWS OF PLYMPTON, MA.PT3

((I first blogged this information in Feb 2014))

Just a few more things about George Barrows and my Barrows ancestry.

First, I have a double descent from George and his wife Patience Simmons.
Here's that list of his children by Lucien Moore Robinson from in the first
post in this series:


16 I. Moses4, b. Feb. 14, 1696-7, m. Mary Carver Dec. 4, 1717.
17 II. George4, b. Mch. n, 1698, m. Desire (Doly.2)
18 III. Samuel4, b. 1700, m. Susannah Tobey, Nov. 21, 1723.
19 IV. Peleg4, b. 1708, m. Hopestill Darling, Nov. 26, 1733.
20 V. Benjamin4, m. Lois Tilson, Oct. 15, 1741.
21 VI. James4, m. 1st, Oct. 15, 1741, 2d Nov. 3, 1726, Mary Coffin.
VII. Patience4, m. Jos. Waterman, 1733.
VIII. Ruth4, m. Seth Sampson, Mch. 19, 1723-4.
IX. Keziah4, m. Saml. Benson, May 21, 1728.
X. Deborah4, m. Caleb Benson.
XI. Sarah4, m. Caleb Cushman, Nov. 1742.


I highlighted the two Barrows children who are my ancestors.I haven't
been able to find a date of birth for Deborah Barrows but I estimate
she was about fifteen years younger than oldest brother Moses. My
double descent comes from the marriage of  Asa Barrows and Content
Benson:



They were first cousins once removed.

Five years agoI took a ride down to Lakenham Cemetery in Carver, Ma. where I found the
graves of George and Patience (Simmons) Barrows as well as the grave of his third wife,
Hannah (Ransom) Barrows. George's second wife Anne Barrows is probably there as well,
but as you can see the headstones are quite weathered so I wan't able to find it.



George Barrows

Patience (Simmons) Barrows

Hannah (Ransom) Barrows



Tuesday, January 30, 2018

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 5: GEORGE BARROWS OF PLYMPTON, MA.PT2

((I first posted this information back in February 2014))

I'd seen reference once before to iron ore and George Barrows in Florence O'
Connor's book on my Dunham and Ellingwood ancestors but hadn't really given
it much thought. But then I ran into more information in Henry Griffith's History 
of the Town of Carver, Massachusetts: Historical Review, 1637-1910.

First, some knowledge about the location of the Barrows homestead which is
of use. The pond mentioned is Sampsons Pond, which was named after a local
Indian sachem:
  
Reckoned from the standpoint of continued influence, George Barrows and John
Murdock were the pioneers of South Carver. Through marital connections Caleb
Cushman, (whose wife was a daughter of George Barrows), established the Cushman
farm about 1740; and later the Saverys were settled in the village through the Barrows
girls. The Barrows property skirted the west shore of the pond and John Murdock held
the claim to the land on the east side. The pond itself was lightly regarded, except for
the fish it yielded and the grassy coves for their hay giving and pasturage qualities. Grassy Island was also used as a pasture, being approached through a slough from the west shore. The old Barrows' homestead stood at the junction of Mayflower road with Rochester road; the Murdock homestead was the farm on the east side of the pond, later known as the Israel Thomas farm; the Tillson farm was located about midway between Rochester road and Meadows road, in what is now known as New Meadows; and it is probable that the main highway at that time passed the Tillson 

house, the  Silas Shaw house, the Barrows house and the Murdock house and so on to the fishery at the outlet of the pond. Rochester road as we travel it, was laid out in 1698, but it is probable that the main travel south was on the east side of the pond, 
and the old roads leading to Halfway ponds and Agawam, show signs of having once 
been main travelled roads.p61-62

History of the Town of Carver, Massachusetts: Historical Review, 1637-1910 , E. Anthony & Sons, Printers,  Carver, Ma.1918


The location of the Barrows and Murdock homesteads came into play because of the
rich iron ore deposits beneath Sampsons Pond.

The operation of Popes Point furnace created a demand for bog ore that gave life to industrial Plympton and the swamps and ponds were regarded as valuable properties. 

A rich bed of this ore was found in Sampsons Pond and tributary coves which was being turned to a source of profit to the abutters when the officials of the town raised the point that the bog was public property. The matter found its way into Town meeting in 1749, where the private claimants were defeated and agents appointed to guard the interests of the public. After a few years of clashing between these factions the courts decided in favor of the private claimants and the pond passed to the control of George Barrows and Bartlett Murdock who in 1758 signed an indenture whereby a line was established extending from a point on the northerly shore to a point near the connection of Sampsons brook, Barrows to have the ore on the westerly side of the line, and Murdock the ore on the easterly side, while each was bound to guard the property of the other against poachers.
p198 ibid

Eventually Murdock would build a second furnace, the Charlotte Furnace, and for about
a hundred years Carver was one of the leading producers of iron cooking and kitchen utensils in the colonies. When the iron ore deposits began to run out in town, more ore was imported from other town in the area and from as far away as New Jersey. Eventually the industry died out, and today the town of Carver is better known for its cranberry bogs and the Edaville Railroad Park and Museum.

But my ancestor George Barrows and members of his family had played a part when Carver was know for its iron furnaces.

To be continued.

Monday, January 29, 2018

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS 2018 WEEK 5: GEORGE BARROWS OF PLYMPTON, MA.PT1

((I first posted this information back in February 2014))


I found the following in an article  THE BARROWS FAMILY by Rev. Lucien Moore Robinson in  The Maine Historical and Genealogical Recorder, Volume 7 (Google 
eBook) (S.M. Watson, 1893).:

(7) George, (Robert2, John1,) b. 1670, m. Feb. 14, 1694, Patience, dau. of John Simmons, a descendant of Moses Symondson who came in "Fortune" 1621. She died Oct. 30, 1723. George m. 2nd, Anne Dunham, June 25, 1724, m. 3d, Hannah Jackson, Dec. 20, 1736.

CHILDREN.
16 I. Moses4, b. Feb. 14, 1696-7, m. Mary Carver Dec. 4, 1717.
17 II. George4, b. Mch. n, 1698, m. Desire (Doly.2)
18 III. Samuel4, b. 1700, m. Susannah Tobey, Nov. 21, 1723.
19 IV. Peleg4, b. 1708, m. Hopestill Darling, Nov. 26, 1733.
20 V. Benjamin4, m. Lois Tilson, Oct. 15, 1741.
21 VI. James4, m. 1st, Oct. 15, 1741, 2d Nov. 3, 1726, Mary Coffin.
VII. Patience4, m. Jos. Waterman, 1733.
VIII. Ruth4, m. Seth Sampson, Mch. 19, 1723-4.
IX. Keziah4, m. Saml. Benson, May 21, 1728.
X. Deborah4, m. Caleb Benson.
XI. Sarah4, m. Caleb Cushman, Nov. 1742.

7. George resided in Plymouth till 1711. The next year he is described as of Plympton where he was already the owner of considerable quantities of land. He was known as "Captain George" and being, it is said, a successful negotiator with the Indians he was often entrusted with the settlement of business affairs with them. He seems to have been a very great enterprising and successful man, brought up a large family, which appear to have intermarried with the most respected families of that vicinity,


He gave deeds to each of his sons during the later years of his life, of lands near him and near to each other, on which it seems that most of them resided. One deed conveys to his sons and sons in law the privilege and the right to take iron ore from Samson's Pond in Plympton, (now Carver) for which they are to pay him two shillings sixpence per ton. Sampson's Pond is in that part of Plympton which became in 1790 the town of Carver. The descendants of George still reside in this town and occupy the lands that have been in their families for several generations.


His son Samuel removed to Killingly, Conn., but "in consideration of fatherly affection" etc., is made the recipient in 1748, of 100 acres of land in Plympton, near "the forge standing on South Meadow River." It seems a fair inference that he must have been quite wealthy. His will disposes of additional quantities of land among his sons, and grand children, and directs the payment of small legacies to his daughters. His son Peleg is made executor and residing legatee. The will bears date September 4, 1750. The original is on file in the probate office in Plymouth, and is witnessed by Nathl. Bradford, Nathl. Leonard Jun. and James Hovey. The signature is written as in the other documents named, "Gorg Barrow" (the handwriting in the opinion of good judges being the same in each. This fact seems to leave no possible room for doubt concerning the identity of this person. It seems to establish the fact that he was the son of Robert, who was the son of John the emigrant to Plymouth. There is a record in an old family Bible in Maine, written by a grandson of this George who came to Plymouth from the West of England in 1668 and married a daughter of George Bonum. But this record we cannot explain. The Plymouth records mention the daughters of George Bonum, giving the name of Ruth and the date of her marriage with Robert Barrow2, Nov. 28,1666, and Patience who m. Richard Willis, Dec. 28, 1670, and Sarah who probably died unmarried. But no record or deed is found referring to any other daughter of George Bonum who married a Burrow or any other person. (George Bonum it may be proper to say in passing, was a prominent man, a land Surveyer, often in public service, and his name frequently appears on the town records. He m. Sarah, dau. of Geo. Morton, Dec. 20, 1644, and died April 28, 1704, 95 years of age. He was a member of the Plymouth Church. The record of the church says, "He lived to a good old age, being about 95. He was a man almost all men spoke well of and is gone to receive his crown."
The will of George Barrows was not presented for probate till 1794, nearly forty years after the death of the testator.
-p144


There's a lot of information in there, and I'll discuss that in the next post.

To be continued.